Tag Archives: Braxton Bragg

Chickamauga 150 Countdown: Grant on Bragg

By Ron Fritze

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During the Civil War and for years after, Grant was known for keeping his opinions about the war to himself. After he left the presidency that changed and Grant started to reminisce. In 1877 he went on a world tour with John Russell Young as the reporter who accompanied him. Over the course of months, Grant started to provide recollections of the Civil War which Young eagerly included in his newspaper columns and a later book. Then toward the end of his life, Grant was financially ruined by dishonest “friends” and needed to leave his family some money. So he wrote his famous memoirs that were completed shortly before his death. They sold well and are a classic of American writing. In Young’s book and his own memoirs, Grant revealed some telling anecdotes about Braxton Bragg as a man and a soldier. Here they are for your enjoyment. Are there any Bragg fans left out there?

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Chickamauga 150 Countdown: The Winner, Part III

By Ron Fritze

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This is excerpt three from a three-part article for the Chickamauga 150 Countdown:

On 23 June 1863, William Rosecrans and his Union Army of the Cumberland took the offensive against Braxton Bragg’s Confederate Army of Tennessee encamped at Tullahoma, Tennessee.  Bragg commanded an army riven by dissent.  He did not communicate his plans with his subordinate generals and they were generally uncooperative with his orders.  Meanwhile Rosecrans conducted a series of flanking maneuvers that kept Bragg off-balance.  By 8 September, he had forced Bragg to abandon the strategically crucial city of Chattanooga and to retreat into Georgia.

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Chickamauga 150 Countdown: The Winner, Part II

By Ron Fritze

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This is excerpt two from a three-part article for the Chickamauga 150 Countdown:

In August 1862, Braxton Bragg and Edmund Kirby Smith launched an invasion of Kentucky. Their plan was to help Secessionists bring Kentucky into the Confederacy and make the Ohio River the northern border of the new nation. On 8 October 1862, units of the Union and Confederate armies fought a battle at Perryville. Bragg was under the misapprehension that he was fighting an isolated segment of the Union forces. Confederate forces attacked and drove back the Union troops. By the end of the day, however, Bragg realized that the entire numerically superior Northern Army of Don Carlos Buell was nearby and rapidly reinforcing their comrades at Perryville. So Bragg broke off the engagement and retreated, or as he put it, withdrew into Tennessee. His action dismayed Kirby Smith along with the other Confederate generals Leonidas Polk and William J. Hardee and they wrote to Jefferson Davis asking him to remove Bragg from command. Davis refused but Bragg’s relationship with his subordinate generals was in tatters.

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Chickamauga 150 Countdown: The Winner, Part I

By Ron Fritze

braggbraxtonbio

This is excerpt one from a three-part article for the Chickamauga 150 Countdown:

When it comes to Confederate military prowess, Braxton Bragg was nobody to brag about. Yes, he commanded the Army of Tennessee at the great victory at Chickamauga but the fact is, the Confederates won because of Rosecrans’ mistake and despite Braxton Bragg’s leadership.
Bragg was born in North Carolina into lower class family. His father, however, developed into a successful business man. This provided the resources for Bragg to get a good education and eventually an appointment to West Point. At West Point, Bragg graduated fifth in his class and also earned a below average number of demerits.

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Chickamauga 150 Countdown: The Mistake

By Ron Fritze

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They call it the “fog of war.” It’s when unforeseen circumstances cause a battle plan to fall apart. It’s when an army’s communication breaks down during the heat of battle. It’s when generals lose track of where their troops are located. Every battle sees mistakes on both sides. Sometimes the mistakes cancel each other out. Other times, a mistake will lose a battle decisively. Chickamauga was one of those battles.

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