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College of Education > NCATE
NCATE

Welcome | Overview & Conceptual Framework | Master Exhibit List
Standard 1 | Standard 2 | Standard 3 | Standard 4 | Standard 5 | Standard 6

Standard 3. Field Experiences and Clinical Practice


The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.

 3.1 Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

How does the unit work with the school partners to deliver field experiences and clinical practice to enable candidates to develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to help all students learn?

The unit and the Field Experience and Internship (FEI) Office has established successful partnerships with the professional community that deliver field experiences and internship enabling candidates to develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to help all students learn. Through these partnerships, candidates have opportunities to reflect on content and build pedagogical skills through application of innovative and best practices for improving student academic performance. The professional community contributes to the unit via multiple forms of feedback. Former superintendents, P-12 teachers and principals serve as intern supervisors. Clinical faculty complete assessments of candidates during field experience and internship. Principals assess graduates through the Graduate Survey. Feedback is analyzed and results are shared with the professional community and faculty. For example, the Teacher Education Council (TEC) is invited to the unit's annual Assessment Retreat to review assessment results and discuss plans for improvement. Recently, principals from surrounding counties met to discuss revisions to the field experience program; their feedback was invaluable in moving forward with the new model.

Candidates are placed in 66 (50%) of the school systems throughout the state demonstrating support and widespread collaboration between the unit and school systems (Exhibits 3.4.b 1, 2, 6). These partnerships are initiated, maintained and enhanced by the FEI Office and faculty (Exhibit 3.4.a 14). In 2005, the unit and the FEI Office formed partnerships to establish P-12 Professional Development Schools (PDS) to provide an opportunity for both the unit and the school to collaborate and support candidates in developing pedagogical knowledge and skills in a school setting. Faculty partner with school administrators, P-12 clinical faculty, and classroom teachers to communicate expectations and enhance learning outcomes for candidates. Samples of collaborative activities are in Exhibit 3.4.a 1-13.

Partnerships for 2012-13 included the following:

  • Schools: Chapman Middle, Sparkman High, Sparkman Ninth Grade, Sparkman Middle, Madison Cross Roads Elementary, Tanner High, Mountain Gap Elementary
  • Systems: Limestone County, Madison County, Huntsville City

 

Field Experience
Field experience is a valuable opportunity for candidates to apply and reflect on content, observe pedagogy and management strategies and, practice teaching skills. The Field Experience (FE) Handbook and related information is located on the unit's website. New students attend an Orientation Seminar at the beginning of ED301 Foundations of Education I for an introduction to field experience procedures and requirements (Exhibit 3.4.e 1-5).

Candidates complete, on average, 266 hours of field experience prior to internship, exceeding the Alabama State Department of Education (SDE) Administrative Code that requires a minimum of 150 hours. The FEI Office assigns and monitors placement days for each candidate to ensure diverse experiences (Exhibit 3.4.b 3-4). Candidates verify completion of field experience days using the Field Experience Verification Form at the end of each semester (Exhibit 3.4.e 10).

Field experience in P-12 school settings is required of all candidates and is embedded in many courses (Exhibit 3.4.b 5). Levels of field experience are associated with each course outlining the recommended degree of candidate involvement. The FE Handbook includes a list of these courses and the assigned level of field experience (Exhibit 3.4.e 11). The progression of candidates and levels of field experiences for all programs include:  

  • Level I – Candidates visit diverse school settings with specific assignments that include occupational validation, analysis of classroom management techniques, verification of theories and instructional practices, conference/interview with principals, clinical faculty, and students. 
  • Level II – Candidates participate in a variety of activities with P-12 students, clinical faculty, and parents. These include one-on-one tutoring, teaching small groups of students and whole class teaching, assisting clinical faculty, case studies, community service, and conferences (Exhibit 3.4.f 33).
  • Level III – Candidates complete internship.

 

Field experience assignments include classroom technology exploration, observing and applying classroom management strategies and, pedagogical knowledge and practices, and reflective writing. Course syllabi include connections between the assignments, conceptual framework, Alabama Quality Teaching Standards (AQTS), EDUCATEAlabama (EA) Standards, State Knowledge and Ability Standards and developing professional dispositions (Exhibit 3.4.f 27, 31-32, 34).

The FEI Office works with school administrators to carefully select clinical faculty to host candidates for field experience (Exhibit 3.4.c 2). Clinical faculty complete one or more of the following candidate assessments:

  • Assessment of Professional Dispositions: Completed for all field experience candidates at each level each semester (Exhibit 3.4.f 21). 
  • EA Assessment: A summative/formal assessment based on EA Standards completed for candidates completing Level II field experience each semester. Unit and clinical faculty collaboratively observe and evaluate candidates' teaching skills based upon EA standards (Exhibit 3.4.f 28-29). This assessment is repeated during internship.

 

Clinical Practice (Internship)
Internship is the culminating teaching experience for candidates. Procedures and requirements related to internship are on the unit's website (Exhibit 3.4.e 7). The FEI Office assigns and tracks intern placements and supervisor assignments. Intern supervisors include full-time and adjunct faculty. Training is conducted at the beginning of each semester to acclimate supervisors to procedures and expectations. In addition, the FEI Office maintains regular communication with supervisors (Exhibit 3.4.e 9). The FEI Office works with school administrators, in conjunction with the Alabama Administrative Code requirements, to carefully select clinical faculty to host interns (Exhibit 3.4.c 1-2).

A triad meeting is conducted between the clinical faculty member, intern supervisor, and candidate at the beginning of the semester to provide orientation information. These meetings continue throughout the semester, serving as a vehicle for frequent and open communication between all three parties. Internships require 75 continuous days of placement. During the first few days/weeks candidates observe and assist clinical faculty. This progresses to 20 days of full teaching responsibility including at least 10 consecutive days in accordance with SDE Administrative Code (Exhibit 3.4.e 6). To ensure that placements include a range of diversities, previous field experience placements are reviewed prior to internship (Exhibit 3.4.b 3-4).

An Orientation Internship Seminar is hosted each semester to familiarize candidates with procedures, requirements, and expectations where they also meet with their intern supervisors (Exhibit 3.4.e 8). During internship, candidates submit a portfolio evidencing effective teaching practices that build on pedagogical knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions. Assignments align internship with conceptual framework outcomes, AQTS, EA Standards, state Knowledge and Ability standards, and developing professional dispositions. Sample assignments are in Exhibits 3.4.f.1-11. An example of candidate impact on student learning is in Exhibit 3.4.a.17. Intern supervisors assess portfolio assignments using a rubric to determine the extent to which the candidate's work addresses learning outcomes from the conceptual framework (Exhibit 3.4.f 24). A summary of these assignments is in Exhibit 3.4.f.13.

Formative/informal assessment is ongoing between the clinical faculty member, the intern supervisor and the candidate. The Intern Observation Record (IOR) is a formative instrument that clinical faculty and intern supervisors use to assess candidate progress. There are two IORs:

  • The candidate/clinical faculty IOR includes instructions for completing evaluations/assessments of candidates using LiveText, candidate progress checklists, and instructions to assess AQTS (Exhibit 3.4.f 26, 3.4.d 1).
  • The supervisor IOR is identical to the candidate IOR and includes instructions for determining the candidate's final grade (Exhibit 3.4.f 23).

 

Candidates and clinical faculty systematically examine results related to P-12 learning. Candidates participate in a process of continuous assessment, reflection, and action directed at supporting P-12 student learning. Candidates collect data on student learning, analyze and reflect on the data, and develop strategies for improving learning. This process continues through scheduled Triad meetings allowing the clinical faculty member, intern supervisor, and candidate to meet and discuss the candidate's IOR and their progression of development with content knowledge. They also review teacher pedagogy, classroom management skills, the candidate's mastery of the AQTS and how they positively impact P-12 student learning. Candidates receive feedback throughout internship from the clinical faculty member and intern supervisor. Supervisors also complete a minimum of two EA assessments for each candidate during internship (Exhibit 3.4 f 25).

 

Assessments and evaluations are strategically and systematically embedded throughout internship. Samples of assessments and evaluations can be found in Exhibits 3.4.f 14-22), 3.4.d 2-3). The unit is committed to reflection and continuous improvement. Assessments and evaluations are regularly reviewed by the FEI Office and unit faculty and adjustments in placements and program design are made accordingly. An overview of these is provided in Exhibit 3.4.f.22. The unit collects aggregate data on candidates entering and exiting internship for all programs (Exhibit 3.4.g 1).

 

 

3.2 Moving Toward Target or Continuous Improvement

Please respond to 3.2.a if this is the standard on which the unit is moving to the target level. If it is not the standard on which you are moving to the target level, respond to 3.2.b.

 3.2.a Standard on which the unit is moving to the target level

  • Describe areas of the standard at which the unit is currently performing at the target level for each element of the standard.
  • Summarize activities and their impact on candidate performance and program quality that have led to target level performance.
  • Discuss plans and timelines for attaining and/or sustaining target level performance as articulated in this standard.

 

 3.2.b Continuous Improvement

  • Summarize activities and changes based on data that have led to continuous improvement of candidate performance and program quality.
  • Discuss plans for sustaining and enhancing performance through continuous improvement as articulated in this standard.

Since the last accreditation visit in 2007, the unit has made a concerted effort to intertwine continuous improvement throughout all aspects of candidate learning including field experience and internship. The unit regularly and systematically collects, aggregates, analyzes, and uses data to propel improvements in the areas of field experience and internship. This data includes collaboration with unit faculty, school administrators, clinical faculty, candidates, and ongoing self-reflection and examination of the current field experience and internship procedures. Examples of this collaboration include: department chair meetings, unit faculty meetings, field experience and internship meetings, collaborative meetings with school administrators and clinical faculty, student focus groups, state department meetings, etc. (Exhibit 3.4.a 16). The unit reviews and discusses assessment and evaluation scores across all majors at the annual Assessment Retreat. While improvements to field experience and internship are ongoing, areas of significant enhancements are explained in detail below.

 

Field Experience
In fall 2012, a Field Experience Task Force was formed based upon input from unit faculty, school administrators and candidates, as well as data and changing national trends regarding clinical experiences. The charge of this committee was to build upon the strengths of the existing field experience program while moving toward a more "medical" clinical model of field experience.

The Field Experience Task force, in conjunction with school administrators, developed a new field experience model that will begin in fall 2014 with full implementation in spring 2015 across all programs. The new model includes two significant enhancements, the ED 302 Foundations of Education II conference and unit faculty-led field experience visits. The ED 302 conference will take place on the university campus. This conference will include activities such as peer teaching, evaluation and reflection; large group discussion and reflection; and simulations and videos with unit faculty leading discussions and group reflection. Unit faculty will model innovative teaching strategies through the use of technology. Guest speakers will share visionary ideas and real life classroom wisdom and experiences.

The unit faculty-led field experience follows the "medical" model of clinical visits. Faculty, in conjunction with the FEI Office, will strategically choose schools and clinical faculty to partner with for this experience. Faculty will be assigned a small group of candidates within the same program area. Unit faculty, along with the small group of candidates, will complete three days of field experience together within one school placement. Faculty will, in advance of the field experience, determine specific learning outcomes and goals for individual students and group reflections. This will provide immediate feedback regarding candidate teaching skills in efforts to better prepare candidates to transition into internship (Exhibit 3.4.e 12).

Field experience assignments will be embedded in candidates' LiveText portfolio. These assignments will be aligned to the unit's new conceptual framework, AQTS, EA Standards, state Knowledge and Ability standards and professional dispositions. Unit faculty will assess candidates' LiveText portfolio assignments based on the learning outcomes stated in the conceptual framework. Thus, the unit will continue to provide candidates with opportunities to develop knowledge, skills and professional dispositions.

Clinical Practice (Internship)
Internship is and will continue to be the culminating teaching experience for candidates. The FEI Office held a meeting in spring 2013 that included unit faculty and school administrators to discuss expectations of newly hired teachers and how the unit could better prepare candidates to foster an environment of increased school performance (Exhibit 3.4.a 15). Based upon input from that meeting and other data, starting fall 2013, the following enhancements were included in internship.

Candidates complete an EA self-assessment (Exhibit 3.4.f 30), which is modeled closely after the current SDE Classroom Teacher Self-Assessment for practicing certified classroom teachers. Elements include a self-assessment and an action plan, which are both based on EA standards and definitions. In the initial self-assessment, which is conducted at the beginning of internship, candidates rate themselves on the EA Standards/Indicators using a scale that includes: novice, competent, and proficient. From that inventory, the candidates select two areas of focus for improvement. Areas for improvement are discussed with the intern supervisor and the clinical faculty member. From there the candidate creates an action plan to address targeted areas of improvement. The action plan is completed during the internship placement. At the conclusion of internship, candidates reflect with the intern supervisor and the clinical faculty member on areas of improvements and gains that have been made. This reflection provides candidates with insight related to areas that could be addressed during the initial phases of the candidate's professional teaching career.

Reflection assignments are strategically included throughout the internship experience. The first reflection assignment allows candidates the opportunity to recognize the diverse needs and skills of the students in their classroom. Based on learner capabilities, the candidate uses learner strengths and weaknesses to develop teaching activities that positively impact student learning. Based upon knowledge of the specific learners in the classroom, the candidate plans a pre-test to assess learner's knowledge/skills. The second reflection assignment allows candidates to reflect on the instructional sequence pre-test evaluation results and how those scores directly impacted the planning, implementation and evaluation of the instructional sequence. The third reflection assignment allows candidates an opportunity to reflect on the post-test evaluation from the instructional sequence. Candidates address the impact on student learning based on the data from the pre and post-test. Candidates also reflect on adjustments and modifications within the sequence that will be used in future planning. The fourth and final reflection assignment allows candidates to reflect on their EA selfassessment plan. Through self examination, candidates reflect on the two targeted areas and evidence of

professional growth.

 

Candidates continue to be observed daily by clinical faculty and regularly by intern supervisors throughout internship. Intern supervisors will continue to complete two EA assessments, which is a summative/formal assessment based on EA Standards. The clinical faculty member also completes one EA assessment for each candidate. The classroom teacher's EA assessment is considered recursive as it is an ongoing observation.

 

Candidates complete an instructional sequence that is both grade and content appropriate for the internship placement. The instructional sequence assignment includes an overview of the topic or concept, learner facts information, specific learner outcomes (standards) using the Alabama Course of Study as a guide, pre-test and post-test, and five instructionally-sequenced lesson plans. These assignments are directly tied to the conceptual framework outcomes, AQTS, EA Standards, state Knowledge and Ability standards and developing professional dispositions. Candidates teach the instructional sequence during internship. The instructional sequence document is assessed by the intern supervisor using a rubric that determines whether the candidate's work addresses learning outcomes stated in the unit's conceptual framework.

 

To provide internship materials and assignments in a more efficient manner to candidates and supervisors, the internship handbook was eliminated and all internship information (assignments, grading, etc.) was placed in Blackboard for online access starting fall 2013. This not only provides easy access to materials but also a location for email communication with interns including announcements and grades. This is the same format that is used in other courses. Transitioning the internship information into this more user friendly format has proven beneficial to both intern supervisors and the candidates. Reflection assignments are strategically included throughout the internship experience. The first reflection assignment allows candidates the opportunity to recognize the diverse needs and skills of the students in their classroom. Based on learner capabilities, the candidate uses learner strengths and weaknesses to develop teaching activities that positively impact student learning. Based upon knowledge of the specific learners in the classroom, the candidate plans a pre-test to assess learner's knowledge/skills. The second reflection assignment allows candidates to reflect on the instructional sequence pre-test evaluation results and how those scores directly impacted the planning, implementation and evaluation of the instructional sequence. The third reflection assignment allows candidates an opportunity to reflect on the post-test evaluation from the instructional sequence. Candidates address the impact on student learning based on the data from the pre and post-test. Candidates also reflect on adjustments and modifications within the sequence that will be used in future planning. The fourth and final reflection assignment allows candidates to reflect on their EA self-assessment plan. Through self examination, candidates reflect on the two targeted areas and evidence of professional growth.

Candidates continue to be observed daily by clinical faculty and regularly by intern supervisors throughout Internship. Intern supervisors will continue to complete two EA assessments, which is a summative/formal assessment based on EA Standards. The clinical faculty member also completes one EA assessment for each candidate. The classroom teacher's EA assessment is considered recursive as it is an ongoing observation.

Candidates complete an instructional sequence that is both grade and content appropriate for the internship placement. The instructional sequence assignment includes an overview of the topic or concept, learner facts information, specific learner outcomes (standards) using the Alabama Course of Study as a guide, pre-test and post-test, and five instructionally-sequenced lesson plans. These assignments are directly tied to the conceptual framework outcomes, AQTS, EA Standards, state Knowledge and Ability standards and developing professional dispositions. Candidates teach the instructional sequence during internship. The instructional sequence document is assessed by the intern supervisor using a rubric that determines whether the candidate's work addresses learning outcomes stated in the unit's conceptual framework.

To provide internship materials and assignments in a more efficient manner to candidates and supervisors, the Internship handbook was eliminated and all internship information (assignments, grading, etc.) was placed in Blackboard for online access starting fall 2013. This not only provides easy access to materials but also a location for email communication with interns including announcements and grades. This is the same format that is used in other courses. Transitioning the internship information into this more user friendly format has proven beneficial to both intern supervisors and the candidates.

 

3.3 Areas for Improvement Cited in the Action Report from the Previous Accreditation Review

Summarize activities, processes, and outcomes in addressing each of the AFIs cited for the initial and/or advanced program levels under this standard.

There were no areas for improvement cited for Standard 3 in the 2007 NCATE Accreditation Review.

 

 

3.4 Exhibits for Standard 3

3.4.a Examples across programs of collaborative activities between unit and P-12 schools to support the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice, including memoranda of understanding

3.4.b Aggregate data on candidate placement in field experiences and clinical practice (Data should be disaggregated by program and level regardless of location or method of delivery)

3.4.c Criteria for the selection of clinical faculty, which includes both higher education and P–12 school faculty

3.4.d Examples of support and evaluation of clinical faculty across programs

3.4.e Guidelines/ handbooks on field experiences and clinical practice for candidates, and clinical faculty, including support provided by the unit and opportunities for feedback and reflection

3.4.f Assessment instruments and scoring guides used for and data collected from field experiences and clinical practice for all programs, including use of technology for teaching and learning (These assessments may be included in program review documents or the exhibits for Standard 1. Cross reference as appropriate.)

3.4.g Aggregate data on candidates entering and exiting from clinical practice for all programs (These assessments

may be included in program review documents or the exhibits for Standard 1. Cross reference as appropriate.)

3.4.a.1 Collaborative Activities: Science Among the Columns Athens State University Summer Enrichment Camp 2013

3.4.a.2 Collaborative Activities: Sci-Quest Hands on Science Program

3.4.a.3 Collaborative Activities: Tanner Summer Enrichment Academy

3.4.a.4 Collaborative Activities: Sparkman Agenda

3.4.a.5 Collaborative Activities: Chapman School (5.4.e.7)

3.4.a.6 Collaborative Activities: Boys’ and Girls’ Club

3.4.a.7 Collaborative Activities: Botanical Garden Summer Camps 2013

3.4.a.8 Collaborative Activities: Mt. Gap K-8 Summer Enrichment Academy

3.4.a.9 Collaborative Activities: Sparkman High

3.4.a.10 Collaborative Activities: PDS Needs Report

3.4.a.11 Collaborative Activities: Status Check

3.4.a.12 Collaborative Activities: Sparkman Middle

3.4.a.13 Collaborative Activities: Summary of PDS Partnerships (5.4.e.5)

3.4.a.14 Collaborative Activities: Public Relation Visits 2012

3.4.a.15 Collaborative Activities: IOR Revision Committee Meeting Spring 2013

3.4.a.16 Collaborative Activities: Administrative Meeting Dec. 2013

3.4.b.1 Internship – Fall 2012

3.4.b.2 Field Experience – Summer 2012

3.4.b.3 Diversity Record Fall 2012 Intern Candidate #1

3.4.b.4 Diversity Record Fall 2012 Intern Candidate #2

3.4.b.5 Field Experience-Days-by-Program

3.4.c.1 ALSDE Administrative Code 290-3-3-.02 (7) (s) Criteria for selecting clinical faculty

3.4.c.2 Criteria for selecting clinical faculty

3.4.d.1 IOR-Classroom Teacher-Early Childhood-Fall 2012

3.4.d.2 Candidate Intern Evaluation of Clinical Faculty (3.4.f.18)

3.4.d.3 Supervisor Evaluation of Clinical Faculty (3.4.f.17)

3.4.e.1 ED 301 Orientation Schedule Fall 2012

3.4.e.2 ED 301 Orientation Schedule Spring 2013

3.4.e 3 ED 301 Orientation Schedule Summer 2013

3.4.e.4 Field Experience Handbook 2012-13

3.4.e.5 ED 301 Orientation Booklet Updated May 11, 2013

3.4.e.6 SDE Administrative Code 290-3-3-.02 (6)(a)8. Internship

3.4.e.7 Internship Handbook Fall 2012

3.4.e.8 Internship Seminar Agenda Spring 2013

3.4.e.9 Spring 2012 Supervisor Newsletter

3.4.e.10 Field Experience Placement by Diversity Component

3.4.e.11 Field Experience Day Requirements by Major

3.4.e.12 New Field Experience Model for Fall 2014

3.4.f.1 Faculty Meeting Internship Assignment

3.4.f.2 Integration of Math Internship Assignment

3.4.f.3 Pacing Guide Internship Assignment

3.4.f.4 Reflections Internship Assignment (1)

3.4.f.5 Reflections Internship Assignment (2)

3.4.f.6 Reflections Internship Assignment (3)

3.4.f.7 School Resources Internship Assignment

3.4.f.8 Technology Integration Internship Assignment

3.4.f.9 Unit Effectiveness Internship Assignment

3.4.f.10 Unit Introduction Internship Assignment

3.4.f.11 Website Critique Internship Assignment

3.4.f.12 Classroom Management Plan Assignment

3.4.f.13 Summary of Assignments and Connecting Standards

3.4.f.14 Intern Assessment of TEP

3.4.f.15 Candidate Evaluation of Intern supervisor

3.4.f.16 Clinical Faculty Evaluation of Intern Supervisor

3.4.f.17 Supervisor Evaluation of clinical faculty (3.4.d.3)

3.4.f.18 Candidate Intern Evaluation of clinical faculty (3.4.d.2

3.4.f.19 Internship Professional Dispositions 2012-13

3.4.f.20 Internship Philosophy using Writing Rubric

3.4.f.21 Professional Dispositions Assessment (1.4.e.1 and 2.4.a.15)

3.4.f.22 Overview of Assessments

3.4.f.23 IOR – Supervisor-Early Childhood – Fall 2012

3.4.f.24 Culminating Portfolio Assignment (Rubric)

3.4.f.25 Internship EA 2012-13

3.4.f.26 IOR –Classroom Teacher –Early Childhood –Fall 2012

3.4.f.27 Diversity Assignment EL 413

3.4.f.28 EA Evaluation

3.4.f.29 EA Field Experience Assessment 2012-13 (1.4.d.5 and 4.4.a.3)

3.4.f.30 EA Self-Assessment Internship Assignment

3.4.f.31 Field Experience Assignment – ED 301 Field Experience Assignment 2012

3.4.f.33 Service Learning Assignment and Rubric from EL 423

3.4.f.34 Pictorial Diversity Assignment EL 423 (also 4.4.b.4)

3.4.g.1 Internship EA 2012-13

3.4.a.17 COE Students Teach Huntsville City Teachers (1.4.g.9)

 

 

 



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